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Endo Questions for the RWE Faculty:

In this area, users are encouraged to ask questions from the RWE Faculty regarding Endodontics in General and the EndoSequence Technique.

Endo Questions for the RWE Faculty:: Recommended Protocol For EndoSequence, BC Sealer Obturation Technique For a Wide Canal

Missing

Joined: January 2016

Rank: Rookie

Posts: 3

#1
Dear RWE Users,
I am new to this forum and I would like to thank everybody for sharing wonderful cases, ideas and experiences on such an open platform. I am a fairly new graduate and definitely very new to modern endodontic techniques.
While I have had experience using K3 Files, System B, Obtura II and GuttaCore, I have no experience using single cone techniques described here.
The other day I was obturating tooth 45 after cleaning and shaping with K3 up to 35/0.06 using a crown down technique. I realized the canal was very wide - could fit a 35/0.06 GP cone to apex and 2-3 cones just progressively short of the apex. I used system B and Obtura II backfill to finish the case.
However, I was wondering how you would obturate this case with BC Sealer and Single Cone Technique described by RWE.
Thanks,
Dr. Novin S.




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Joined: November 2013

Rank: Faculty General

Posts: 43

#2
In reply to Novin Sabzevari You're not required to use one cone for Hydraulic Condensation. When you have an oval canal or very large canal you can put additional cones next to the main cone. Hydraulic Condensation is based on the bioceramic filler filling the canal and not the gutta percha. The gutta percha only acts as a carrier. So, it works well with one matched cone when the canal shape mimics the shape of the cone and when it doesn't, then put additional cones in there. But the point to be made is that the seal comes from the bioceramic cement, not the gutta percha. So, it doesn't matter how thick the cement layer is. But some people still prefer to minimize it by placing additional cones when there's room. 
Missing

Joined: January 2016

Rank: Rookie

Posts: 3

#3
Thank you for your response.

How do we predictably avoid voids forming between the two carriers or anywhere else where the sealer is not just a lining?
Screen_shot_2013-11-27_at_7.08.57_pm

Joined: November 2013

Rank: Faculty General

Posts: 43

#4
In reply to Novin Sabzevari The sealer is hydrophilic. Therefore it has great wetting angle. You should not get a void, especially when you inject and have a large enough volume. If you're using the basic technique of simply coating, then you have to make sure you have the right volume of sealer to fill the spaces. You can always use lateral condensation if you feel like you have room. But you don't need to do it as religiously as you did before since the goal is not to minimize the sealer interface.